When YOU least expect it…

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barn-owlfromBING101915What I must do is all that concerns me, not what the people think.  This rule, equally arduous in actual and intelligent life, may serve for the whole distinction between greatness and meanness.  Ralph Waldo Emerson

It continues to give me pause of the biases people have, based either on age or appearance.  Each generation often greets another generation with surprise, rather than acceptance of what knowledge/skills they have.  I experienced this phenomenon again yesterday when a person couldn’t believe that I passed an exam, because her unconscious bias placed the biggest look of surprise on her face I haven’t seen in a long time.

Positive outcomes during the day often balance the negativity we may experience.  It is a work in process to learn how not to take certain actions personally or become judgmental of what may be said.  The daily balancing of our soft skills is the platform for managing ourselves and others in our career path.

Surprising ourselves with what is curious could be a mantra that leads us to self-development.  As you Choose Who You Want to be Known As this week, when you least expect to — have fun practicing the element of surprise of a curious situation.

Enjoy your day!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive and Career Management Coach

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Impossible fun . . . with curiosity

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th6NJHG7XZMickeyMouseclipartBING092515It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.   Curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.  Walt Disney

Earlier today I published a post on LinkedIn Pulse with the Title of The Three R’s.  http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/three-rs-jo-ann-m-radja.  Here is a modified version of that post.

A man in a creative job had been working on a new project. He submits it to the client and a discussion ensues. Even though the project was deemed unacceptable for the marketplace, he believed the discussion was fair. It was such a shock and a setback to subsequently learn his staff was hired away from him (except one man) by the company who deemed his work was out-of-fashion. This story occurred sometime during the 1920’s.  Whether it is a myth or a restatement of history, unfortunately, this story rings true for many people.
The terms of reinvent, re-engineered, retooled or right-sized were not spoken in this creative man’s era; his story has universality for us today, some 90 years later.  What Walt Disney did with his one employee was to collaborate and re-work his original drawings. Mickey Mouse was then born and introduced to the community. Many of the action terms we use today – customer driven, vision and focus, brain-storming new ideas and visualizing real-world activities for the new character – took place in the development and implementation of the Mickey Mouse character.

How quickly do you rebound from a serious let-down? What did you tell yourself to regroup and continue on? Did you re-frame the situation or just recognized perhaps the timing was all wrong? Stating these questions another way: What feedback did you receive that continued the spark in you to recognize, relate and resolve your actions to the next step? How frequently do you rely on YOUR three R’s As You Choose Who You Want to be Known As?

During the month of October, I hope your three R’s work to your best advantage as you recognize, relate and resolve.

The Three R's542by478

“Jo Ann” M. Radja Executive and Career Management Coach

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. . . on the Contrary

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Earlier today I published two anagrams you might enjoy reading on LinkedIn Pulse at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/whats-contrary-you-jo-ann-m-radja. The text of that post now follows:

C onventional wisdom

O ften, yet not always, is right.

N ow is the time

T o consider whether the

R isk we’ve focused on merits,

A n all-out program

R oll-out this quarter. I vote

Y es. How about you?©Jo Ann M. Radja

E nergy to keep up with

T he reading

H as its downside. The upside

I s the kernel of applicability to understand

C onsequences we face in the

S hort term.©Jo Ann M. Radja

                 Have a great Fall Season in your career as you Choose Who You want to be Known As.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive & Career Management Coach

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“Talk to Inform” – Your Storyboard

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0511-1204-0312-1815_Woman_giving_a_presentation_at_a_lectern_clipart_imageBING080615 As is often the case when you are looking for something, you come across another idea.  Here is an idea that may be of interest to you when you want to create a storyboard for your next writing, presentation, or meeting at the office.  It’s called, “Talk to Inform – Visual Aid Mate.”   [I am not the author and unfortunately, this color visual  aid shows no company name or copyright information.]

It consists of 10 boxes printed on legal size paper, landscape print setting.  Talking to Inform not only requires a Subject, but the Importance of the Benefit to your audience as well as an Outline of how you are going spend the audience’s valuable time during your Talk on the Subject. [Boxes 1 through 3]

Boxes 4 through 8 contain the Body of the Talk that may contain your personal experiences, expert opinions, analogies, statistics, facts and examples of how your Subject Matter relates to the audience.  Boxes 9 and 10 represent how you Recap and Confirm the Benefit to the audience.  So completing these 10 boxes and you’re done!

We all look for ways to streamline our work flow and I hope this brief idea is helpful to you when you need a self-management tool.    Have a great week in your career!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive & Career Management Coach

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LABEL, LABELED, LABELING

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It’s interesting how people want others to know who they are. We like to be known either by our strengths, by our family position or by what we do for a living. Yet, there are times when a situation arises where we may say,   “Please don’t label me as . . . . .”  We express those words because we want to choose how we are evaluated, and perhaps because the label we heard “rubbed us the wrong way.”

Our salary depends on our performance for a position that we chose to accept. So, our employer does label us for the position we hold and we agreed to that labelUnder what circumstances does labelling come into play in our careers?    While researching a few blog ideas, I came across a fresh presentation of how people can be defined in their roles at the office.   It is called Dr. Edward de Bono’s “SIX THINKING HATS” [registered mark].  The California State University at Los Angeles prepared a brief slide share presentation explaining each “Thinking Hat” …

http://web.calstatela.edu/faculty/jpark/Six%20thinking%20hats.ppt

Should you be a Red Hat and strive to become a Green Hat, how would you obtain the educational training to do so?  Online and brick and mortar classes are available as well as many Human Resource Departments.  Business and Civic organizations also offer programs for self-development.  As you Choose Who You Want to be Known As let your Label shine though as you manage your career.  Enjoy your day!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive and Career Management Coach

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Notes: http://www.debonothinkingsystems.com/tools/6hats.htm

 

 

When the Journey, begins anew…

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imagesGoogle051915usairforcefighterjets

 

“Feel the fear.  Do it anyways.”  Anonymous

I just finished reading Kimberly Weisul’s article in Inc. Magazine about Ms.Carey Lohrenz, a recently promoted Navy Tomcat fighter jet Pilot. http://www.inc.com/kimberly-weisul/high-performance-high-stress-advice-from-a-fighter-pilot.html    Ms. Weisul, an Editor-at-Large at Inc. Magazine teaches us how to interview.  I say this because her article surprisingly has many realistic stories about Pilot Carey Lohrenz’ career path on how she felt the fear and kept on going.

We love quotations because the words ring true for us and leave lasting perceptions and images in our minds.  Pilot Lohrenz’ words of wisdom on performance and leadership are:

“The number one way to reduce anxiety in a volatile environment is to write down your top three priorities and focus on those.”

“Almost all the pilots I worked with wrote notes on their hands – what went wrong and how to fix it” pretty quickly.

“It’s notoriously difficult to be an Officer.”          How she made it was taking on the fear and working through the experience to find a way for herself  to make it work – again, again, and again.  After each successful experience, Pilot Carey began a new journey to test herself against the next issue she was asked to handle.

As you work through your career this week, Choose Who You Want to be Known As, when you are pushing to make it through the day, the project or the week.  Enjoy your week!

Executive & Career Management Coach

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Anchors Aweigh to your Choices

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behavioral-financeAnchoringGOOGLE012215

Today is the first day of Daylight Savings Time and we are adjusting to the loss of one hour.    I have come across a few articles recently about how the anchoring choice of a decision comes into play. The conversation of how we truly decide and move forward is always on-going.  Neuroscientists and Psychologists keep us busy reading their latest articles and the above picture shows another view of what goes on when we begin to make decisions.

Anchors Aweigh is a phrase used to release the weighted anchor holding a ship at the harbor.  Anchoring Decisions is a form of cognitive bias we all have which may be based on our education, culture, whether we grew up in a small or large family and the physical environment we enjoyed as children.  When we choose the first piece of information we hear about an event, we anchor on to itAlthough we may ask for some other information, we usually go back to the first piece of information we hear, because we unconsciously believe it to be true.

Perhaps some people haven’t considered how often they anchor what they hear.  Often times we wonder why someone may not move from a “position” and anchoring may be the reason.  Here is an additional view of how our unconscious bias influences our decision making.

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During this second week of March, 2015, consider how you Choose Who You Want to be Known As when reaching out to understand another person’s decision.  Have a great week!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive and Career Management Coach

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Reflections on the 1st Friday in February 2015

3dmagicmodelsdotcomTurtlecroppedThe Willis Clan Turning Tragedy into Triumph    We are resilient this Winter no matter where we call home.  I hope you enjoy this link for a bit of music as well as an earlier Blog, published under my name today at LinkedIn Pulse https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/friday-reflections-next-week-jo-ann-m-radja.  The text now follows:

“It is difficult for most people to live up to The Golden Rule, and consequently few of us do so with complete consistency.  Tom Morris

We confront horrible evil and we see the most exalted forms of good more often in art and history than in the ordinary course of daily life.  Tom Morris

Love is simply the most important key to proper success, authentic happiness and genuine meaning in life. . .  despite any appearances to the contrary in our world.  Tom Morris

If you want to communicate your differences quickly to customers, change your label.  Mike Michalowicz

You make a decision, often, on less than one percent of the information, because you have to.  Mike Michalowicz

Identify your top clients and remove the rest of your less-promising clients.  Mike Michalowicz.”

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Career Management Coach & Change Agent

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How to manage the Common Good

BING_012815NYBlizzardAn earlier version of this post was published by this author today with LinkedIn Pulse, under the title, “Managing the Common Good” at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/managing-common-good-jo-ann-m-radja.  Here is the text for your convenience:

“Managing the Comon Good

Quite some time ago, a friend of mine at work asked if I wanted to join her on a trip to Worchester, Massachusetts. She was a young Board Member of a national ethnic organization and planned to attend the annual conference. Of course, I jumped at the chance and received the okay to take a Friday and Monday off from work. Some seven months earlier, while on vacation, I met a guy from Nantucket, and was excited to see him again, as he was a student at Worchester College.

We travelled in the “dead of winter.” The day before we were scheduled to leave, a snow storm hit; the wind drifts blew snow against the Holiday Inn, covering the first two floors of the Inn. We were blocked in and couldn’t get out. We stayed an extra two days until it was safe to leave the Inn and drive to Logan Airport. I was thankful my employer understood the situation and the Worchester, MA community had the necessary equipment to dig out from the storm.

Early this morning, I read that Worchester, MA, had some 31 inches fall during the past two days. The entire Nantucket community had no electric power and the temperature was sub-zero. A reporter wrote how he had to climb out of his home window to get outside because the door, which opened only one way, was blocked with snow. It was predicted that The Storm of the Century would blow through the Eastern Seaboard. The Common Good Theory came into Play. State and Local Governments issued Orders to protect communities from harm and ensure safety.

We often don’t take notice how local government protects its citizens. The organization of various agencies, fire, police, transportation, weather, medical all have to come together. It is no small feat to ensure the Common Good when interpreting weather is not an absolute science. No known entity controls the Weather. Scientists and educated people interpret data and reasonable judgments are made. Should we really blame someone for not knowing, ahead of time, how miles above the earth the wind abruptly shifts and a forecast is no longer wholly accurate.

Management, whether private or government does not have all the answers. It surely recognizes this fact and decides the next step, based on presently known information. Governing from the “Syco Slate” game* of “Maybe so”, or “Without a doubt,” or “Most likely,” doesn’t work. Let’s look for the random acts of kindness that took place by government employees who worked on our behalf, in difficult weather conditions. Isn’t that the real story, together with the careered government people who looked out for us?

As you Choose Who You Want to be Known As, consider who looks out for you, when weather conditions, stand in the way of your career choice.

Enjoy your career this week!

‘Jo Ann’ M. Radja, Career Management Coaching & Change Agent

http://careermanagementcoaching.me @Coach_Jo_Ann

*Syco Slate is the predecessor of the Magic 8 Ball of chance.

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We Winced…

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I’ve hear it say that “People have a short memory.”  Democrats would hope that is true as well as the Chicago Bears.  The Democrats felt it last week when the election results turned sour for many.  Watching the Chicago Bears yesterday, you felt it as well.  We winced, we can’t seem to watch it, any more than that moment, a minute or the next few hours.

We have great empathy for well-known groups of people who are having a really bad time of it when they stop competing as a group.  We may take it for granted that unquantifiable circumstances led to a poor showing of their performance.  We wince with pain during our lives and following a public blow to our ego. Yet, failure breeds a new determination to try again.  Like a Phoenix – life anew rises above the ashes.

If we were in the shoes of a public faux pax – we would be grateful for a mindful perspective.  It would –  to be observant, to be descriptive, to act, to be non-judgmental and to take it on the chin.  Yes,  we winced in defeat but it’s not over yet. Guy Kawasaki’s wisdom may come into play – “A good idea is 10% implementation and hard work and 90% luck.”

As you Choose Who You Want to be Known As this week, consider how you dealt with a career move that you wished didn’t happen. How did you  turn it around?       Have a great week!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Career Management Coach and Change Agent

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