How to manage the Common Good

BING_012815NYBlizzardAn earlier version of this post was published by this author today with LinkedIn Pulse, under the title, “Managing the Common Good” at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/managing-common-good-jo-ann-m-radja.  Here is the text for your convenience:

“Managing the Comon Good

Quite some time ago, a friend of mine at work asked if I wanted to join her on a trip to Worchester, Massachusetts. She was a young Board Member of a national ethnic organization and planned to attend the annual conference. Of course, I jumped at the chance and received the okay to take a Friday and Monday off from work. Some seven months earlier, while on vacation, I met a guy from Nantucket, and was excited to see him again, as he was a student at Worchester College.

We travelled in the “dead of winter.” The day before we were scheduled to leave, a snow storm hit; the wind drifts blew snow against the Holiday Inn, covering the first two floors of the Inn. We were blocked in and couldn’t get out. We stayed an extra two days until it was safe to leave the Inn and drive to Logan Airport. I was thankful my employer understood the situation and the Worchester, MA community had the necessary equipment to dig out from the storm.

Early this morning, I read that Worchester, MA, had some 31 inches fall during the past two days. The entire Nantucket community had no electric power and the temperature was sub-zero. A reporter wrote how he had to climb out of his home window to get outside because the door, which opened only one way, was blocked with snow. It was predicted that The Storm of the Century would blow through the Eastern Seaboard. The Common Good Theory came into Play. State and Local Governments issued Orders to protect communities from harm and ensure safety.

We often don’t take notice how local government protects its citizens. The organization of various agencies, fire, police, transportation, weather, medical all have to come together. It is no small feat to ensure the Common Good when interpreting weather is not an absolute science. No known entity controls the Weather. Scientists and educated people interpret data and reasonable judgments are made. Should we really blame someone for not knowing, ahead of time, how miles above the earth the wind abruptly shifts and a forecast is no longer wholly accurate.

Management, whether private or government does not have all the answers. It surely recognizes this fact and decides the next step, based on presently known information. Governing from the “Syco Slate” game* of “Maybe so”, or “Without a doubt,” or “Most likely,” doesn’t work. Let’s look for the random acts of kindness that took place by government employees who worked on our behalf, in difficult weather conditions. Isn’t that the real story, together with the careered government people who looked out for us?

As you Choose Who You Want to be Known As, consider who looks out for you, when weather conditions, stand in the way of your career choice.

Enjoy your career this week!

‘Jo Ann’ M. Radja, Career Management Coaching & Change Agent

http://careermanagementcoaching.me @Coach_Jo_Ann

*Syco Slate is the predecessor of the Magic 8 Ball of chance.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ “

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