MUSINGS 2019 The 4th of July Week #3 William Dawes

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July 3, 2019

Our unsung Patriot hero today is William Dawes who, like Paul Revere, rode through villages and towns from Boston to Lexington and Concord during the same evening of April 18, 1775 (known as the Midnight Ride of Paul Revere).   These men rode to alert many communities that, “The British enemy are Coming.”   A map of the routes taken by each man is shown below. What is unknown is why 41-year old Paul Revere became famous and 30-year old William Dawes did not. Revere was arrested shortly after his ride ended. Dawes escaped to Lexington and a third rider, Dr. Samuel Prescott escaped to Concord. (Dr. Prescott met Revere and Dawes at Lexington.) The National Park Service map is shown here:

Perhaps the answer is found in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride” when he, in the first stanza, wrote, “Hardly a man is now alive who remembers that famous day or year.”  https://poets.org/poem/paul-reveres-ride

It’s been reported that Paul Revere was a father of 16 children and William Dawes was a father to seven children. Perhaps this information was important to Poet Longfellow. Eighty-five years after the Midnight Ride, Longfellow used his imagination and literary flair as he wrote his poem in 1860. It was published in the January 1861 edition of The Atlantic Monthly.

Trying to locate more information about Paul Revere last evening, I located a timeline of his noteworthy military accomplishments. https://historyofmassachusetts.org/paul-revere-timeline/   One year after his Midnight Ride he was commissioned a Major of Infantry in the Massachusetts militia. It’s no wonder a Sons of Liberty patriot, Paul Revere, was revered by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.    Enjoy your Holiday tomorrow as you Choose Who You Want to be Know As.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach
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Notes:
https://mentalfloss.com/article/60919/11-ordinary-people-who-did-extraordinary-things-aid-american-revolutions
https://www.history.com/news/the-midnight-ride-of-william-dawes

https://poets.org/poem/paul-reveres-ride

Paul Revere Timeline

MUSINGS 2019 the 4th of July Week #2 Militia Women

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When we recognize that only three things are really in our power …what we believe, what we desire and what we move forward – we free ourselves radically from those attitudes of subservience and emotional bondage that hold too many people back from their proper development and inner personal success in the world. Tom Morris


Many of us were taught about the Militia Men in the American Revolutionary War. They were neighbors who were prepared to defend their local community against advancing British Troops.

We may not have learned that Colonial Women also embraced their Patriotic duty. Instead of buying British goods, they learned to weave wool into fabric to sew clothes for their families. They became farmers who bore children and learned to raise them without their husbands at home. After the Boston Tea Party, women learned how to make tea from local native plants. A group of women who became Militia Women in the town of Pepperell, Massachusetts, is the subject of this Blog.

It became known to resident Prudence Cummings Wright of Pepperell, Ma, following a conversation she had overheard, that British spies would be sending messengers from Canada to the British Troops in Boston. These messengers would be passing their community from Groton at the Jewett Bridge. After Prudence shared this information with the women of the village, they elected Prudence the Head of the Wright Guard. The women armed themselves with whatever muskets remained in the village, pitchforks and other farm items and laid in wait at the Bridge Passing on a night in April, 1775.   Mrs. David Wright’s Guard did indeed hear the two spy messengers coming down the path and the Guard was successful in taking them down. Their documents were confiscated and the men were sent to the Area’s Safety Committee. As a Memorial to the Women Militia of April, 1775, the following Granite Tablet has been placed near Jewett’s Bridge, located over the Nashua River, MA..

Near this spot a party of Patriotic Women, under the leadership of Mrs. David Wright of Pepperell, in April, 1775, captured Leonard Whiting, a Tory who was carrying treasonable dispatches to the enemy at Boston. He was taken prisoner to Groton and the dispatches were sent to the Committee of Safety at Cambridge.”

What is omitted from this Granite Tablet is that Leonard Whiting was accompanied by Samuel Cummings, the brother of Prudence Cummings Wright. He too was arrested and subsequently imprisoned. A year and a half later in the Fall of 1776, Samuel Cummings jumped his bail and left a wife and three children fatherless. The court case of Leonard Whiting found he was not a traitor. He was judged not to be a traitor because as a commissioned officer he followed the loyalty of his commission, albeit, an English Officer.

We learn about ourselves as we learn from others. This American story demonstrates how family’s make difficult choices when they stand up for their beliefs. During this 4th of July Week, Choose Who You Want to be Known As. Enjoy.       “Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach

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Notes: 1) https://mentalfloss.com/article/67905/9-women-who-helped-win-american-revolution

2) https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/massachusetts/beautiful-covered-bridges-ma/ This bridge was constructed similarly as the Jewett Bridge near Pepperell, MA.

3) The above quotation is found on page 86 of, The Stoic Art of Living, Inner Resilience and Outer Results by Tom Morris (2014) Open Court Publishing Company a division of Carus Publishing Company.

MUSINGS During 2019 4th of July Week #1 Crispus Attucks

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Although in other things there are great distinctions of rank and birth, virtue is available to everyone.  She thinks no man unworthy if only he thinks himself worthy of her.  Seneca

July 1, 2019
It’s July 4th week and the colors of red, white and blue are in the neighborhoods of Chicago. There are many facts about the American Revolutionary War that we may not know and I wish to share a few of them with you over the next four days.

Many colonists became Patriots because they wanted to get out from the tyranny of British Rule. The Boston Massacre of March 5, 1770 is an example of protesting that ended in a deadly riot. It took place on Kings Street in front of the British Customs House in Boston, MA. Among the many men who died that day on the street, there were six men who were shot at close range. The first to die is believed to be Crispus Attucks, an escaped slave of African and Native American descent. At the time of his death he was known to be both a tanner and a sailor. The historical legends of this Massacre were remembered some 100 years later by the poet John Kyle O’Reilly (1844 – 1890). O’Reilly’s poem became known by his words about Crispus Attucks, “The first to defy and the first to die.” Many of the poets in the 18th Century wrote long poems, as did John Kyle O’Reilly. Here is a link to the entire poem about Crispus Attucks  

https://allpoetry.com/Crispus-Attucks   The last few words of the poem are:

For this, shall his vengeance change to love, and his retribution burn,
Defending the right, the weak and the poor, when each shall have his turn;
For this, shall he set his woeful past afloat on the stream of night;
For this, he forgets as we all forget when darkness turns to light;
For this, he forgives as we all forgive when wrong has changed to right.

And so, must we come to the learning of Boston’s lesson to-day;
The moral that Crispus Attucks taught in the old heroic way;
God made mankind to be one in blood, as one in spirit and thought;
And so great a boon, by a brave man’s death, is never dearly bought!
© by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

Choose Who You Want to be Known As this week!  Enjoy.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach

Notes: (1) The above quotation is found on page 54 of, The Stoic Art of Living, Inner Resilience and Outer Results by Tom Morris (2014) Open Court Publishing Company a division of Carus Publishing Company.

2.   http://www.crispusattucksmuseum.org/crispus-attucks
3,  https://ramericanhistory.wordpress.com/2017/10/31/the-boston-massacre-and-crispus-attucks-the-first-to-defy-the-first-to-die/

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April Reflections and PRESENCE

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This April during the last 16 days of the month, many people will be practicing their traditions of worship. It is a time of reflection of who they are, how they relate to people in their community and the world at large.  Reflection takes place to recognize shortcomings and how to define a place in their life with humility and courage.  The Poet John O’Donohue explains the beauty of self-transformation by describing how we change without knowing we have it within ourselves to do so:

FOR PRESENCE – Awaken to the mystery of being here and enter the      quiet immensity of your own presence.

Have joy and peace in the temple of your own senses.

Receive encouragement when new frontiers beckon.

Respond to the call of your gift and the courage to follow it’s path.

Let the flame of anger free you of all falsity.

May warmth of heart keep your presence aflame.

May your outer dignity mirror an inner dignity of soul.

Take time to celebrate the quiet miracles that seek no attention.

Be consoled in the secret symmetry of your soul.

May you experience each day as a sacred gift woven around the heart of wonder.

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Enjoy yourself as your reflection of who You Choose to be Known As results in a positive experience for you in your business and personal life! Happy Holiday to those of you who are celebrating! Here follows an anagram to consider during this Holiday:

E asy to gaze out the window

T rying to forget incivility.

H ow we handle the self-managed situation

I s

C omforting to those involved.

S o why don’t we self-manage more often? ©Jo Ann M. Radja

The above poem by Poet John O’Donahue can be found on page 42 of the book, Bless the Space Between Us, ©2008 by John ODonahue, published by DOUBLEDAY.

The above Blog was originally published by LinkedIn on April 17, 2019 under the title, “Reflections. . . April, 2019.”

Do YOU still SURPRISE yourself during the SPRING season?

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A few years ago, I wrote two blogs during the month of March.  The first was entitled, “How will you SURPRISE yourself this SPRING?” https://careermanagementcoaching.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/how-will-you-surprise-yourself-this-spring/? and the second was entitled, “What’s Your 2016 Spring Surprise?”   https://careermanagementcoaching.me/2016/03/20/whats-your-2016-spring-surprise/ An anagram for the words Spring Day was included in each Blog.      Today, I want to share with you another anagram for the words Spring Day as you  Choose Who YOU Want to be Known As.

S ervant Leadership
P erhaps is a phrase not used often in today’s jargon. Yet, 
R esolving to put your people first 
I n order to augment their contributions
N ecessary for their development and performance
G oes a long way for profitability and stability of a company.
D eciding to accept feedback from those you work with gives rise to 
A gility and accountability bubbling to the surface.
Y ou hone your strengths to be the best you want to be in your career journey. ©Jo Ann M. Radja 03/25/19
LIFE IS GOOD  “Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach
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IT’S NEVER EASY. . .

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E very business person today understands

T he #Me Too Movement.  Yet it is still

H ard to Believe that someone

I nsists he had the right to walk into someone’s residence
and announce, “He’s in

C harge now,” and begin to harrass a woman who multiple
times tells him to

S top. ©Jo Ann M. Radja

The Non-Violence movement is remembered today on the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s birth.  As  a Leader within the civil rights movement in the 1960’s, he espoused how a Non-Violent Movement could provide dignity and respect for those who faced racism.  Dr. King holds, for many cultures, a heroic status of how to act in a nonviolent way.

I was in my residence when the scenario discussed above in the ETHICS Anagram occurred last Friday.  The man was not in Charge of anything.  The situation was scary to say the least.  It begged me to try to remain calm as the man had a mission that held no rationality to it.  It was only when I said that he was on camera (not mine, the building’s) that he ran out, after some five minutes.

As you Choose Who You Want to be Known As this week, consider how your actions can provide respect and dignity to others It’s never easy in a difficult or crisis situation, yet we have to do the best we can under the circumstances.  Have a good week!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach   Life in Good

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Chicago Thanksgiving Week 2017

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Our rural ancestors, with little blest,
Patient of labour when the end was rest,
Indulged the day that housed their annual grain,
With feasts, and off’rings, and a thankful strain.
Alexander Pope  

From Chicago this Thanksgiving Week, I hope you enjoy this American holiday, whether you are with family, or friends, or on your own . . .perhaps these Chicago pics will remind you how we are one as these pictures can be seen by us all.  Happy Thanksgiving!

As you Choose who You Want to be known as this week, Enjoy the holiday!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive and Career Management Coach

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Note:  The above quotation is found at http://www.http://www.wow4u.com/qthankfulness/

All pictures displayed above were shot from my Apple 7 camera this morning.

Labor Day 2019

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Happy Labor Day to All!  We continue  to wish for safety in our communities as we did two years ago.


L essons we learned
A lways come to mind when we are called to
B e our best when adversity strikes.
O ur humanity shows as we
R each out to give back to our community.

D ependability, selflessness and care
A re the cultural values we witness from
Y ou, our Southern Americans this 2017 Labor Day.©
Best wishes on this 2019 Labor Day as you Choose Who You Want to be Known As.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Certified Practitioner Marshall Goldsmith Global Leadership Assessment, Certificates for Team
and Coach Stakeholder Centered Coaching

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Monday Anagrams – What’s your Awareness. . .

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 Although we lost an hour Early yesterday morning, we made it through the day this Monday.  Throughout our career path, we lose time, appointments, colleagues and friends and an occasional discussion.    It happens that we grow, develop and become more aware of who we are and how we interact with others.    Since I traveled to New York City on business, twice this month, I wanted to share with you a few anagrams I wrote, as follows:

 E arnestly the Speakers engaged

T he audience to

H ear how their journeys gave them strength to change.

I t never fails to reach the

C onsciousness of each person’s awareness.

S electively, we chose our next steps.  ©Jo Ann M. Radja

 

E arly on it became clear

T hat a Speaker told the truth.

H e said, “What was for many of us, was not in our future.”

I t was necessary to Pivot in order to 

C hange our chosen path.  Be guided by your integrity

S o the judgment of others won’t keep you from your Purpose..  ©Jo Ann M. Radja

 

 E verything outside of the vehicle was very still.  After

T he quick glance out his window, the driver

H eard no voices or sounds on the street or parkway.  He

I nstantly and 

C asually drove slower at 1:30am.

S o we continued to be safe for the next 10 blocks.  ©Jo Ann M. Radja

 

 E ver so softly people moved

T hrough the 9/11 Museum this Sunday morning.

H ow it affected people was

I nterrupted by watching

C arefully placed videos.  We were reminded to

S ee though our pain in order to appreciate the joy of the value of life.  ©Jo Ann M. Radja

Have a great week as you Choose Who You Want to be Known As.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive & Career Management Coach

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What’s Your Philosophy – On Mature Expectations?

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The best part of our lives we pass in counting on what is to come.  William Hazlitt

We smile as we read text describing the difference between the use of “a” and “the.” It happened to me as I read a four-page paper by Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford, entitled, “Mature Information Societies – A Matter of Expectations.”   Mature_Information_Societies_a_Matter_of

Floridi’s premise is that “a” is more appropriate when discussing the digital information society because it refers to groups as opposed to “the,” that references one. Digital bandwidth itself, all over the world doesn’t provide a basis to judge the benefit of information to society. Rather, it is the expectation of information that drives education, understanding and innovation for each country’s philosophy of life. Expectations are viewed as mature when balanced by an acknowledgement that all people in the society may not be able to share your specific expectations. In other words, the right to expect more is coupled with knowing everyone may not equally be able to share in the output of digital information.

From a business prospective, companies work daily  through expectations they have for their customers, their employees and stakeholders. Mature societal expectations point to three avenues, according to Floridi, as follows:

a)  Education – Creates awareness of your own assumptions and expectations; Allows for justification, reasonableness and historical determination of your expectations.

b)  Understanding – When society implements a particular right of use it recognizes deficiencies associated with the right of use.

c)  Innovation – Mature expectations assist in creating informative actions, ordinary vs. extraordinary, normal vs. abnormal.

The philosophy of digital information results in mature expectations for the common good. Haven’t we all asked one or more of the following questions: How will this benefit the customer? Why are we moving foward on this project when the risk evaluations are not yet completed?

It’s time to recognize we all have a philosophy for the common good developed on the back of digital infrastructure. As you Choose who YOU want to be Known As in whatever societies you participate in, consider your Expectations for what you give, what the other person gets  and what benefit is provided. Enjoy the upcoming weekend!

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive and Career Management Coach

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