MUSINGS 2019 The 4th of July Week #3 William Dawes

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July 3, 2019

Our unsung Patriot hero today is William Dawes who, like Paul Revere, rode through villages and towns from Boston to Lexington and Concord during the same evening of April 18, 1775 (known as the Midnight Ride of Paul Revere).   These men rode to alert many communities that, “The British enemy are Coming.”   A map of the routes taken by each man is shown below. What is unknown is why 41-year old Paul Revere became famous and 30-year old William Dawes did not. Revere was arrested shortly after his ride ended. Dawes escaped to Lexington and a third rider, Dr. Samuel Prescott escaped to Concord. (Dr. Prescott met Revere and Dawes at Lexington.) The National Park Service map is shown here:

Perhaps the answer is found in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride” when he, in the first stanza, wrote, “Hardly a man is now alive who remembers that famous day or year.”  https://poets.org/poem/paul-reveres-ride

It’s been reported that Paul Revere was a father of 16 children and William Dawes was a father to seven children. Perhaps this information was important to Poet Longfellow. Eighty-five years after the Midnight Ride, Longfellow used his imagination and literary flair as he wrote his poem in 1860. It was published in the January 1861 edition of The Atlantic Monthly.

Trying to locate more information about Paul Revere last evening, I located a timeline of his noteworthy military accomplishments. https://historyofmassachusetts.org/paul-revere-timeline/   One year after his Midnight Ride he was commissioned a Major of Infantry in the Massachusetts militia. It’s no wonder a Sons of Liberty patriot, Paul Revere, was revered by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.    Enjoy your Holiday tomorrow as you Choose Who You Want to be Know As.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach
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Notes:
https://mentalfloss.com/article/60919/11-ordinary-people-who-did-extraordinary-things-aid-american-revolutions
https://www.history.com/news/the-midnight-ride-of-william-dawes

https://poets.org/poem/paul-reveres-ride

Paul Revere Timeline

MUSINGS 2019 the 4th of July Week #2 Militia Women

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When we recognize that only three things are really in our power …what we believe, what we desire and what we move forward – we free ourselves radically from those attitudes of subservience and emotional bondage that hold too many people back from their proper development and inner personal success in the world. Tom Morris


Many of us were taught about the Militia Men in the American Revolutionary War. They were neighbors who were prepared to defend their local community against advancing British Troops.

We may not have learned that Colonial Women also embraced their Patriotic duty. Instead of buying British goods, they learned to weave wool into fabric to sew clothes for their families. They became farmers who bore children and learned to raise them without their husbands at home. After the Boston Tea Party, women learned how to make tea from local native plants. A group of women who became Militia Women in the town of Pepperell, Massachusetts, is the subject of this Blog.

It became known to resident Prudence Cummings Wright of Pepperell, Ma, following a conversation she had overheard, that British spies would be sending messengers from Canada to the British Troops in Boston. These messengers would be passing their community from Groton at the Jewett Bridge. After Prudence shared this information with the women of the village, they elected Prudence the Head of the Wright Guard. The women armed themselves with whatever muskets remained in the village, pitchforks and other farm items and laid in wait at the Bridge Passing on a night in April, 1775.   Mrs. David Wright’s Guard did indeed hear the two spy messengers coming down the path and the Guard was successful in taking them down. Their documents were confiscated and the men were sent to the Area’s Safety Committee. As a Memorial to the Women Militia of April, 1775, the following Granite Tablet has been placed near Jewett’s Bridge, located over the Nashua River, MA..

Near this spot a party of Patriotic Women, under the leadership of Mrs. David Wright of Pepperell, in April, 1775, captured Leonard Whiting, a Tory who was carrying treasonable dispatches to the enemy at Boston. He was taken prisoner to Groton and the dispatches were sent to the Committee of Safety at Cambridge.”

What is omitted from this Granite Tablet is that Leonard Whiting was accompanied by Samuel Cummings, the brother of Prudence Cummings Wright. He too was arrested and subsequently imprisoned. A year and a half later in the Fall of 1776, Samuel Cummings jumped his bail and left a wife and three children fatherless. The court case of Leonard Whiting found he was not a traitor. He was judged not to be a traitor because as a commissioned officer he followed the loyalty of his commission, albeit, an English Officer.

We learn about ourselves as we learn from others. This American story demonstrates how family’s make difficult choices when they stand up for their beliefs. During this 4th of July Week, Choose Who You Want to be Known As. Enjoy.       “Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach

http://www.wordpress.com/disclosures
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa This is a paid-for Business Account, hosted by WordPress. It is for informational purposes only and NO cookies of a viewer’s personal data are kept by the owner of this account.

Notes: 1) https://mentalfloss.com/article/67905/9-women-who-helped-win-american-revolution

2) https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/massachusetts/beautiful-covered-bridges-ma/ This bridge was constructed similarly as the Jewett Bridge near Pepperell, MA.

3) The above quotation is found on page 86 of, The Stoic Art of Living, Inner Resilience and Outer Results by Tom Morris (2014) Open Court Publishing Company a division of Carus Publishing Company.

MUSINGS During 2019 4th of July Week #1 Crispus Attucks

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Although in other things there are great distinctions of rank and birth, virtue is available to everyone.  She thinks no man unworthy if only he thinks himself worthy of her.  Seneca

July 1, 2019
It’s July 4th week and the colors of red, white and blue are in the neighborhoods of Chicago. There are many facts about the American Revolutionary War that we may not know and I wish to share a few of them with you over the next four days.

Many colonists became Patriots because they wanted to get out from the tyranny of British Rule. The Boston Massacre of March 5, 1770 is an example of protesting that ended in a deadly riot. It took place on Kings Street in front of the British Customs House in Boston, MA. Among the many men who died that day on the street, there were six men who were shot at close range. The first to die is believed to be Crispus Attucks, an escaped slave of African and Native American descent. At the time of his death he was known to be both a tanner and a sailor. The historical legends of this Massacre were remembered some 100 years later by the poet John Kyle O’Reilly (1844 – 1890). O’Reilly’s poem became known by his words about Crispus Attucks, “The first to defy and the first to die.” Many of the poets in the 18th Century wrote long poems, as did John Kyle O’Reilly. Here is a link to the entire poem about Crispus Attucks  

https://allpoetry.com/Crispus-Attucks   The last few words of the poem are:

For this, shall his vengeance change to love, and his retribution burn,
Defending the right, the weak and the poor, when each shall have his turn;
For this, shall he set his woeful past afloat on the stream of night;
For this, he forgets as we all forget when darkness turns to light;
For this, he forgives as we all forgive when wrong has changed to right.

And so, must we come to the learning of Boston’s lesson to-day;
The moral that Crispus Attucks taught in the old heroic way;
God made mankind to be one in blood, as one in spirit and thought;
And so great a boon, by a brave man’s death, is never dearly bought!
© by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

Choose Who You Want to be Known As this week!  Enjoy.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Executive Coach

 

Notes: (1) The above quotation is found on page 54 of, The Stoic Art of Living, Inner Resilience and Outer Results by Tom Morris (2014) Open Court Publishing Company a division of Carus Publishing Company.
2.   http://www.crispusattucksmuseum.org/crispus-attucks/

 

3,  https://ramericanhistory.wordpress.com/2017/10/31/the-boston-massacre-and-crispus-attucks-the-first-to-defy-the-first-to-die/
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa This is a paid-for Business Account, hosted by WordPress. It is for informational purposes only and NO cookies of a viewer’s personal data are kept by the owner of the account.

4th of July 2018

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4 times a year we celebrate a Patriotic Holiday. T raffic going and coming everywhere  H urrying to enjoy a great day     O f celebrating our freedom   F rom tyranny, oppression and terrorists.     J ars of ketchup, mustard and … Continue reading

July 4th 2014

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  4 times a year we celebrate a Patriotic Holiday. Traffic going and coming everywhere  Hurrying to enjoy a great day     Of celebrating our freedom   From tyranny, oppression and terrorists.     Jars of ketchup, mustard and hot sauce on the table, Unforgettable … Continue reading

4th of July 2013

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This gallery contains 2 photos.

                        4 times a year we celebrate a Patriotic Holiday. Traffic going and coming everywhere  Hurrying to enjoy a great day     Of celebrating our freedom   From tyranny, oppression and terrorists.     Jars of ketchup, mustard and hot sauce on … Continue reading