Symbol of GRATITUDE

thCADXFPZ6SymbolOfGratitudeBING111913Neuroscience is understanding the fundamental nature of ourselves…how we think, feel and do.  Dr. Charles “Ed” Connor

 

 

 

Two days ago in my home State of Illinois, a multitude of tornadoes struck communities in at least 13 Counties.  [It was reported some 17 tornadoes were sited and by Monday morning, 80 tornadoes blew through the Midwest Region.]

Many people who were interviewed, spoke about how grateful they were to be alive.  While their home was destroyed, they could rebuild.  While their possessions were taken in this act of nature, their life was spared.  While years of joy in maintaining and furnishing their home was wiped out in a second or two, they were in a community of friends and neighbors (nearby and within Illinois), who gave them solace and friendship. The SYMBOL OF GRATITUDE resided in their hearts.   Finding the personal truth in yourself during a time of crisis is a learned virtue as these citizens Chose Who they wanted to Be Known As.

The symbol of gratitude itself has been a bit difficult to track down.   The circle is an accepted symbol of inclusiveness and represents many aspects of our human nature.    Our Global community throughout the world has roots within the spirituality of GRATITUDE and the use of a circle symbol.

An art exhibit entitled, “Beauty and the Brain Revealed”  is presently on display at the AAAS Art Gallery in Washington, D.C.    Five days ago,  Megan Gambino posted a Blog explaining this Art Exhibit  http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/11/do-our-brains-find-certain-shapes-more-attractive-than-others/).  Her Blog included a brief video of two Neuroscience Experts who discuss how our brains relate to abstract shapes.

Whether from exemplary observations of our neighbors or from recognized Neuroscientists, Choose Who You Want to be Known As in your careers,  during this wintry week of November, 2013.

“Jo Ann” M. Radja, Career Management Coach

Notes: “Beauty and the Brain Revealed” is on display at the AAAS Art Gallery in Washington, D.C., through January 3, 2014.  Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/11/do-our-brains-find-certain-shapes-more-attractive-than-others/#ixzz2l6p7kWlg Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Why do we find some works of art so appealing? The exhibition Beauty and the Brain Revealed at the American Association for the Advancement of Science builds on a 2010 collaboration between the Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute at the Johns Hopkins University and

the Walters Art Museum to examine how the brain perceives abstract sculpture. The original project was initiated and funded by the Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute. Gallery visitors will wear 3-D glasses to explore digitally morphed versions of sculpture and learn how 3-D

shape characteristics relate to aesthetic preferences. Through January 3, 2014

http://srhrl.aaas.org/projects/science_society/neurosociety/art.shtml November 19, 2013.

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